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AAAE Security SmartBrief February 9, 2012

April 11, 2012

30,000-Foot View

PreCheck will expand to 28 airports this year 
The federal government this year will expand its expedited screening program known as PreCheck to 28 airports. The program is now in place at seven airports. It allows frequent fliers and individuals enrolled in Trusted Traveler programs to avoid removing their shoes, belts and coats while passing through security. “Good, thoughtful, sensible security by its very nature facilitates lawful travel and legitimate commerce,” said Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano. “The expansion of TSA PreCheck to the nation’s busiest airports will increase our security capabilities and expedite the screening process for travelers we consider our trusted partners.” Reuters (2/8) The Wall Street Journal/Dow Jones Newswires (2/8) CNN (2/8)

Security Update

Air marshal investigation results in terminations, Pistole says 
Several people were fired as a result of an investigation of the Federal Air Marshal Service, Transportation Security Administration Administrator John Pistole said. The investigation focused on allegations of sexism, bigotry and incompetence. “In terms of addressing those issues, obviously, a number of personnel changes were made,” Pistole told reporters today. “Several people were fired. Some people resigned. New management was brought in in several locations to address both the perception and the reality of the situation.” ABC News (2/8)

Investigation finds that shipper did not screen cargo 
A federal investigation found that a cargo shipper did not screen cargo loaded onto a passenger jetliner at Indianapolis International Airport. “When it comes to national security, there is no room for error, and we have no tolerance for shortcuts,” U.S. Attorney Joe Hogsett said. The company has agreed to pay $1 million in a civil fine. Three employees are facing criminal charges. The Indianapolis Star (2/8)

Trends & Technology

Travel budgets are strained by outdated business policies, study finds 
A significant number of corporations are spending more than they have to for business travel because they simply haven’t updated their program and policies for years, according to a study conducted by American Express Global Business Travel. “A healthy travel policy can help companies achieve long-term success [and] support business-critical goals such as risk mitigation and employee engagement,” said Christa Degnan Manning, director of the research. Fox Business (2/7) IndustryWeek (2/6)

Republic uncovers possible buyers for Frontier, CEO says 
Republic Airways Holdings has found potential buyers for subsidiary Frontier Airlines, said Republic CEO Bryan Bedford. “We’ve had a number of calls from potential interested parties, saying, ‘When you’re ready to talk we want to talk with you,'” Bedford said. “We haven’t been ready to talk yet.” Republic will also be open to structuring a deal as a “co-investor” in Frontier, he said. Bloomberg Businessweek (2/6) The Wall Street Journal (2/7)

Policy & Regulatory

Lawmaker introduces bill to overturn DOT fare-disclosure rule 
Rep. Tom Graves, R-Ga., has introduced legislation to reverse the Department of Transportation rule that requires airlines to include government fees and taxes in advertised airfares. “If the goal of the DOT’s rule is to prevent companies from deceiving passengers about the total cost of their ticket, why is the department mandating that airlines hide the taxes, surcharges and government fees in the fine print?” Graves said. The Seattle Times/Tribune Media Services (2/7)

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